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Lynn Beighley’s Drupal for Dummies, a Book Review

A review of a beginners’ book on Drupal.

Lynn Beighley’s Drupal for Dummies

Lynn Beighley’s Drupal for Dummies is a beginners’ reference for learning the basics of Drupal. Frankly, after getting through the installation, it all seemed rather simple, which I suppose is a testament to Ms. Beighley’s skills as a writer and an educator. I don’t mind reviewing a book with the word “Dummies” in the title.

Drupal logo
Drupal logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

The book is written in the standard Dummies modular format, whereby you can skip around if you wish and not lose too much by not taking everything in order. A good thing, as the chapter on setting a strategy inexplicably comes after the one on installation. To my mind, that is placing the cart before the horse. Don’t we want a strategy before we go to the trouble of purchasing a domain and starting to put content out there? After all, a poorly conceived site could financially harm a company.

The book is also a little confusing when it comes to differentiating pages and stories. Stories seem to be aggregations of pages, or they might be more frequently updated than pages, but that’s tough to tell at first read.

The book discusses forums a bit but does not go far into community management as a whole. There doesn’t seem to be anything in here about, for example, restricting user access or even out and out denying a user access to any given site. While banning users is not the only function of a Community Manager, it’s still an important one, and it can be one that needs to be performed rather quickly. It’s outside of scope to talk about community management theory, strategy or values, but a quick how-to when it comes to banning users would be a fine (and small!) addition to this book. However, using a Captcha to eliminate auto-joining bots, and Mollom to detect spam, are covered.

 

The main features of Drupal come out when Ms. Beighley talks about themes and basic site modules, such as blogs, image galleries and storefronts. The reader begins to see why Drupal might be a good choice for creating a website. There’s little to no coverage of the Open Source culture that created Drupal, but that’s probably beside the point.

The main purpose of the book is to get an Administrator started with setting up and using Drupal, but there’s very little on modification, shy of basic changes such as swapping out themes. One never gets into the guts of the application and the hood is never lifted. There are links pointing to websites where a user can learn more about the application, but they seem to be tacked onto the end of the book. Even a pointer to a more advanced Dummies book on Drupal (even if there’s an attempt to bundle two books in order to increase the profit to the enormous Dummies empire) would be of some help.

It just feels like, when you get to the end of the book: now what?

Rating

2/5

By Janet

I'm not much bigger than a breadbox.