Categories
LinkedIn

InMaps – Visualize Your Network on LinkedIn

InMaps – Visualize Your Network on LinkedIn

InMaps were cool.

Let’s say you’ve got a nice, growing network on LinkedIn.

InMaps - Visualize Your Network on LinkedIn
Linkedin Chocolates (Photo credit: nan palmero)

Hurray! Now let’s say that it’s gotten large enough that you’re unsure of how it’s all trending. After all, what if your network is dominated by people who used to work at Fidelity but you want to get into Prudential instead? How can you see how things are shaking out? Or maybe you want to get a handle on job titles that you’re seeing – what if most of your network consists of tradespeople in your area, rather than people who might actually be able to find you something? If you’re an accountant, a network full of hairdressers and landscape contractors is lovely but it might not be really doing it for you, eh?

Here’s where InMaps came in.

What InMaps Does

Essentially, what LinkedIn was doing is, instead of geographically mapping your connections, they were mapping other meaningful relationships among all of those people. So instead you could see things like job titles that frequently come up, and other connections. These included who used to work where. If you’d worked in several places (like I have) you might have seen one former employer dominate, particularly if you’d just left a particular role.

After all, when Hachette Book Group and I parted ways, suddenly I connected to the other seventeen or so people who were being outsourced. There was a bit of urgency to getting connected, and we wanted to maintain friendships. I’d had to dig a bit in order to find former colleagues further back in my career. And, by the way, FYI, this does behoove one to try to make connections. These connections would be both during employment and to reach back to older connections. This is because the natural push to connect might not come about if you’re thinking about a job you held twenty years ago, long before LinkedIn existed.

InMaps Downside

It would take a while for LinkedIn to generate an InMap. Particularly if you’ve got a lot of connections. This was a feature that never really got out of Beta, so that was totally understandable.

But here was the InMap for a woman named Leslie Gotch Zarelli. So this should give something of an idea about how the overall pattern looked. Her InMap (I would have posted mine, but LinkedIn never generated one) was dominated by general areas like Legal. Plus she had probably a former employer or two, and what appeared to be some job duties.

More information was here. LinkedIn discontinued the service in 2015 and never really replaced it. So your contacts now are static. A pity, as it was a great idea. LinkedIn – people want this! Get mappin’!

Categories
Career changing

Community Management Haikus

Community Management Haikus

Community Management Haikus are – I will be the very first person to admit this – a rather silly topic. This is a Friday topic, a bit of fun as this can, often, be a rather fun sort of a profession and industry. After all, you are spending your time tweeting, posting to Facebook, and using Google+. You are making videos, and you are writing blog entries (much like this one, actually).

The truth is that, although it can also, sometimes, be a laugh riot, community management and the overall discipline of social media marketing can sometimes be rather serious. We may need to cobble  together some sort of a response to rather somber news, such as a death in our industry or our community or our company. We may have to address angry customers, disillusioned share holders, or the bewildered folks among us who just need a little help and then they can be on their way.

We are deadly serious, as we do our best to cut down on the number of technical support calls, or increase customer engagement and satisfactions. Or maybe we just want to create a memorable experience and, in the meantime (assuming that the stars and the planets all align absolutely perfectly), get someone to bookmark our link or subscribe to our RSS feed.

Come back, we cry. Come back and we will dazzle you with even niftier content.

But I’m rambling here. Maybe we just, sometimes, want to write something that can only charitably be referred to as pseudo-artsy.

Haiku for You

Community Management Haikus

Fun with the topic
feel free to add more in the
comments section, please

Community is
four syllables, so comm is
abbreviation

Fear, uncertainty
doubt commingle with robot
avatars and posts

Small things can blow out
of proportion, as there’s no
tone emoticon

Social media –
substitute for life? Maybe.
Or just leisure time