I love the canine point of view. There is just something about writing about a species that is so incredibly close to us yet their ‘language’, such as it is, is vastly different. Furthermore, dogs experience so much more than we do when it comes to scent that their perceptions have to be rendered in that manner.
If your southern American characters sound like Gomer Pyle, and your Mexican characters sound like Señor Wences, you are probably not doing such a hot job with depicting their accents. Same with a British character who ends up sounding like Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins. Just, don't.
The biggest and most measurable benefit is that it keeps you writing. You can often spark creativity by simply being creative, that is, you write five or seven days per week, and you can fill up that writing time fairly readily. But if you only write three times per month, you may find you have writers' block when you make the infrequent attempt. There is something about the pressure of deadlines or at least the pressure of your own internal expectations. It helps to not have a blank page to stare at all the time.
When Jewish characters (for example) are on the screen, does the audience get more than an occasion reference to Chanukah? Or do they just get a surname, or a trope? Or worse, do they get thinly-veiled anti-Semitic caricatures? Are LGBTQ characters defined by their sexuality, or are they stereotyped, or is it no big deal? Or are they killed off quickly, once they're no longer useful to the plot, the show runners, or the network?
Adventures in Career Changing | Janet Gershen-Siegel | Transitioning from Fanfiction
For every exciting intellectual property out there, whether it's books, films, YouTube videos, TV programs, or something else, it all started somewhere.
If you don't spend time planning, you'll spend it writing. And if you don't spend time writing, you'll spend it editing. If you don't spend time editing, then packaging becomes enormous and takes longer. If you don't work on packaging and spend time on it, then querying will take longer, because you'll be faced with more rejections. And finally, if you don't spend time querying, and just take what you can get (and that includes self-publishing—no slam on it, but it is something we do without spending any time on querying), then you will spend that time on marketing.
Janet Gershen-Siegel's writing, Untrustworthy Tathrelle Velexio Izalla Adger
The inspirational song for this book is Bastille's Pompeii. Years later, and I am still incapable of hearing the song without thinking of the book, and vice versa.
Adventures in Career Changing | Janet Gershen-Siegel | Bad Reviews
No matter how bad your review is, it will still be listed on your reviewer page on Amazon (yes, they exist; just click on a reviewer's name). This is a small spreading of news/linking back, and it will be helpful—almost no matter what you say. Almost.
Adventures in Career Changing | Janet Gershen-Siegel | Middling Reviews
Because this is not a negative review, you can add some length to it. But because it's not unremittingly positive, it does not have to be lengthy. The ideal length is probably about 50 to 100 words. If you want to say more, contact the writer in private. For self-published works, editing and republishing are usually pretty easy. Hence if you find a glaring translation error, the writer can fix it. You can save the day with your review.
Adventures in Career Changing | Janet Gershen-Siegel | Positive Reviews - Trust Agents
Just saying you loved a piece is not enough. It's better than nothing, of course. But you, too, are a writer. You can do better than that!
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